Restoration Projects—Charles Runyan's TR5 —Scroll down to see the latest developments

This is the photo of my TR5 inner body shell loaded on a truck to go to the sandblasters. The car had been wrecked a few years ago by a former employee on his wedding day. The frame and front center body were damaged, but the car came through the ordeal fairly well. In the photo, you can see a good bit of welding, as the sills and floors were rusted. This is not the first time the car was restored, but I drove it through the winter a couple of years in the late 1990’s. The outer sills currently available are not so great, but my body man made the best of them. In the photo, they look like they are pop-riveted, but those little circles are actually spot welds. Note that the door openings are braced to keep them straight. Actually, all of the body panels have been prefitted, but they came off again for the sandblasting and painting of the inner body. This car was always signal red, and signal red it will be again. My TR5 has always been my favourite car. I will keep you posted on the restoration!

TR5 primered
TR5 primered side view

Then the TR5’s inner body shell went to the sandblasters. It is too much to hope that it will be ready for Summer Party this year, but it should be done in plenty of time for next year. Don’t forget to register for Summer Party. The dates are July 30th and 31st. The theme this year is “24 Hours of LeMans,” or “24 Heures du Mans.” Dress up, or turn your car into a LeMans Racer! Think of yourself, driving along on the interstate cleverly disguised as a race car and driver! You have almost three months to think up a good story to tell the state trooper who stops you!

TR5 PAINTED
TR5 Paint

The process of painting my TR5 body shell has begun. All of the hidden parts of the body shell have received red paint, while the unhidden ones have been masked off for painting at a later time.

The car is nearly complete now except for mechanicals, and I am starting to worry about my front “TR5” badge and my rear “TR5 PI” badge. The ones I had were decent, but I sent them off to a badge manufacturer in England for a quote on twenty-five of each. TRF has already manufactured all of the TR250 badges to a high standard, and we have the “2500” badges on the rear fender sides in excellent quality. The TR5 badges will take a considerable investment on my part, and only two customers have indicated an interest, one of them being me. Therefore, I hesitate to commit the funds. Does anyone have a pair of original badges for sale? I’d like to have some for my car without having to completely scrap the manufacturing project by asking for my own badges back. If anyone has an interest in the TR5 badge project, please e-mail me at trfmail@aol.com.

   

We have begun to collect the fuel injection components that will be required for my TR5 after the engine has been built over the next couple of months. I don’t know how many readers are aware that the Lucas mk.2 fuel injection system used on TR5 and non-US TR6 models is completely mechanical. That means it is completely non-electronic, i.e. something completely different from what modern mechanics are working on today. The mk.2 system was developed as a simplification of the mk.1 system used on many British Formula I cars of the 1960’s. The fuel is measured and delivered to the injectors by a metering unit mounted with the distributor and driven off the camshaft. The fuel is kept at a pressure of 100 p.s.i. by a pump mounted in the trunk near to the tank. The engine is very attractive with a large tubular air manifold on the RH side of the engine. This air manifold has an elephant trunk that connects to the air filter mounted just behind the grille. These photos are not of my car, but show the fuel injection system on other TR5's. See Below for an updated photo of the fuel injectors, posted in March 2011.

Petrol injectors
TR5

Restoration Projects—Charles Runyan's TR5 ENGINE AND GEARBOX

I am delighted that my TR5 engine has come out of C.A.R. Components this week, along with the gearbox and overdrive assembly. As the TR5 is one of the most valuable Triumph models, I want to keep my car looking completely stock with the exception of the Lucas fuel pump which doesn’t work very well. Once I learned about the Bosch pump, I had one fitted, and the car has been a joy to drive ever since. The original Lucas pump overheats in warm climates, like summer in Pennsylvania, and a vapor lock forms which stops the car. I used to strap a bag of ice to the fuel pump to keep it cool, and honestly, that worked pretty well, but water always dripped out of the trunk drain from the melting ice.

TR5 engine
GEARBOX

The TR5 engine was always potent with 150 BHP. I wanted to keep it pretty much stock, and a stock cam was located. Wiseco forged pistons and Carillo rods were fitted, however, and a great deal of balancing and hand fitting was done. A stock PI cam was purchased from Racetorations, and it was checked for lift and the valve spring pressure was carefully considered. The crank and flywheel were balanced by C.A.R. Components on our new balancing machine, and this work will be done in-house on all customer engines in future. In the head, valve pockets were massaged to remove sharp edges and to smooth flow. Valves were cut on three angles, and finally ground in by hand. All engines built at C.A.R. Components receive careful workmanship, and everything done to my engine is also available to customers, some of it at extra cost.

My gearbox and overdrive were also carefully rebuilt by C.A.R. Components and tested here. They have designed a test bed, and all gearboxes and overdrives are tested before they are shipped to customers. You can see photos of both engine and gearbox by using the links provided. These will be up by Friday evening if possible, but surely by Saturday. My engine does not have a valve cover yet, as my original one has been sent off to the chrome shop. I chose to fit a stock valve cover for the reasons mentioned above. A TR5 was a very cool car, and I am lucky to have it. I feel that I must keep it as it was designed to be. I will have more photos later when the engine has been installed in the car and fitted with its PI equipment.

The TR5 engine was always potent with 150 BHP. I wanted to keep it pretty much stock, and a stock cam was located. Wiseco forged pistons and Carillo rods were fitted, however, and a great deal of balancing and hand fitting was done. A stock PI cam was purchased from Racetorations, and it was checked for lift and the valve spring pressure was carefully considered. The crank and flywheel were balanced by C.A.R. Components on our new balancing machine, and this work will be done in-house on all customer engines in future. In the head, valve pockets were massaged to remove sharp edges and to smooth flow. Valves were cut on three angles, and finally ground in by hand. All engines built at C.A.R. Components receive careful workmanship, and everything done to my engine is also available to customers, some of it at extra cost.

My gearbox and overdrive were also carefully rebuilt by C.A.R. Components and tested here. They have designed a test bed, and all gearboxes and overdrives are tested before they are shipped to customers. You can see photos of both engine and gearbox by using the links provided. These will be up by Friday evening if possible, but surely by Saturday. My engine does not have a valve cover yet, as my original one has been sent off to the chrome shop. I chose to fit a stock valve cover for the reasons mentioned above. A TR5 was a very cool car, and I am lucky to have it. I feel that I must keep it as it was designed to be. I will have more photos later when the engine has been installed in the car and fitted with its PI equipment.

1-13-2011

My TR5 is very nearly completed now with only some parts to install on the engine, including the P.I. system. The interior was installed this week, and the top may have been installed today.

TR5 INTERIOR

   

PETROL INJECTORS 3-25-2011

TR5 Fuel Injectors are ready to be installed. The subject is the fuel metering unit and fuel injectors from my TR5. They were rebuilt in England by Prestige Injection, and the assembly includes new nylon fuel pipes. We had a hard time getting all of those springy pipes to pose nicely for a photo, but I think Karen got a pretty good shot. The Lucas fuel injection is completely mechanical rather than electronic, and it was developed for Formula I cars in the 1960’s. The fuel metering unit measures each shot of fuel and then squirts it through one of the tubes to a specific injector. It is a very high-quality unit, and it accomplishes this fuel metering, varying the amount to conditions such as idling and acceleration, thousands of times each minute.

T5 fuel injectors
TR5 Petrol Injectors